De Azúcar

“On the other hand, I eagerly took advantage of that privilege of childhood which allows beauty, luxury, and happiness to be things that can be eaten: in the rue Vavin I would stand transfixed before the windows of confectioners’ shops, fascinated by the luminous sparkle of candied fruits, the cloudy lustre of jellies, the kaleidoscopic inflorescence of acidulated fruit-drops –green, red, orange, violet: I coveted the colours themselves as much as the pleasures they promised me. (…) the pink of the sweets used to shade off into exquisite nuances of colour, and I would dip an eager spoon into their brilliant sunset. (…) Mama would take her seat at the grand piano to accompany a lady dressed in a cloud of tulle who played the violin and a cousin who performed on the cello. I would crack between my teeth the candied shell of an artificial fruit, and a burst of light would illuminate my palate with a taste of black-currant or pineapple; all the colours, all the lights were mine, the gauzy scarves, the diamonds, the laces; I held the whole party in in my mouth.”

Learn more ...

De Azúcar

“On the other hand, I eagerly took advantage of that privilege of childhood which allows beauty, luxury, and happiness to be things that can be eaten: in the rue Vavin I would stand transfixed before the windows of confectioners’ shops, fascinated by the luminous sparkle of candied fruits, the cloudy lustre of jellies, the kaleidoscopic inflorescence of acidulated fruit-drops –green, red, orange, violet: I coveted the colours themselves as much as the pleasures they promised me. (…) the pink of the sweets used to shade off into exquisite nuances of colour, and I would dip an eager spoon into their brilliant sunset. (…) Mama would take her seat at the grand piano to accompany a lady dressed in a cloud of tulle who played the violin and a cousin who performed on the cello. I would crack between my teeth the candied shell of an artificial fruit, and a burst of light would illuminate my palate with a taste of black-currant or pineapple; all the colours, all the lights were mine, the gauzy scarves, the diamonds, the laces; I held the whole party in in my mouth.”


Passage from “Memoirs of a Dutiful Daughter” (Simone de Beauvoir), 1958
Translated by The World Publishing Company (1959)



In this project, memory and childhood memories are a very important part of González’s work. As an artist she is interested in these small details and daily rituals, in transforming childhood activities such as dancing, playing ball, celebrating a birthday party or going to the playground, into a sculptural and pictorial process.


González’s work is focused on closely studying simple processes such as a game or a family party and interpreting them once again as if using a magnifying glass on their own reality. González starts with the tiny details of a dress’s creases and of paper garlands’ folds and by means of a color palette she creates a parallel universe where memories and reality fantasize and get together to give way to a new form of collective memory.


This is a work that through a meticulous job and multiple techniques magnifies childhood moments and gives them a new dimension that is almost absurd and disproportionate.